World Air Photography Blogs

Flying Enterprise

Flying Enterprise A/S was a Danish charter operator formed in May 1959.

Flying Enterprise Ticket Cover

Flying Enterprise Ticket Cover

Operations were started in January 1960 with an Argonaut. In 1961 the company became a subsidiary of the Heimdal A/S Shipping Company. At one time five Argonauts were operated, but they were disposed and three 104-seat DC-7s acquired.

THE ARGONAUTS
Licencebuilt Douglas DC-4, Canadian Name “Northstar”, BOAC designation “C-4 Argonaut, those were the aircraft leased by Flying Enterprise. As 51 of the 71 Northstar’s built were pressurized I figure that the BOAC versions were pressurized.

Flying Enterprise  C-4 Argonaut  at Kastrup (CPH)

Flying Enterprise C-4 Argonaut at Kastrup (CPH)

The Argonaut could carry 62 passengers (90 in a modified version) and were equipped with 4 Rolls-Royce Merlin 620 piston engines, 1.725 hp each.

Flying Enterprise  C-4 Argonaut in Colour.

Flying Enterprise C-4 Argonaut in Colour. CPH

Canadair Aircraft Ltd. took over the Canadian Vickers Ltd. operations on 11 November 1944. Besides the existing Consolidated PBY Canso flying patrol boats in production, a development contract to produce a new variant of the Douglas DC-4 transport, was still in effect. The new Canadair DC-4M powered by Rolls-Royce Merlin engines emerged in 1946 as the “North Star.” More than just an engine swap, the North Star had the Douglas DC-6 nose, landing gear and fuselage shortened by 80 in (2 metres), DC-4 empennage, rear fuselage, flaps and wing tips, C-54 middle fuselage sections, wing centre and outer wing panel, cabin pressurisation, a standardized cockpit layout and a different electrical system.

Canadair built 71 examples under the designations: North Star, DC-4M, C-4 and C-5. With the exception of the single C-5 (which had Pratt & Whitney R-2800 engines, as fitted to the Douglas DC-6), these variants were all powered by Rolls-Royce Merlin engines and 51 of the production examples were pressurized.

The last Argonaut in FE service

The last Argonaut in FE service

When Aircraft turn to scrap. Always a sad moment.

When Aircraft turn to scrap. Always a sad moment.

Flying Enterprise acquired three 104-seat DC-7s in 1962/63 and they formed part of the Conair fleet.

FE DC-7 at Kastrup,

FE DC-7 at Kastrup,

FE DC-7 Seating Plan

FE DC-7 Seating Plan

During 1965, Simon Spies acquired Flying Enterprise A/S and the company was renamed a week later to Conair A/S of Scandinavia and continued to operate for Spies Rejser A/S.

FE DC-7 In the new Conair Colour

FE DC-7 In the new Conair Colour

Some 30 years later Conair merged with Scanair, the former SAS subsidiary, to become Premiair (renamed MyTravel Airways in 2002 and Thomas Cook Airlines Scandinavia in 2008).

Thomas Cook Airlines Scandinavia Airbus A320

Thomas Cook Airlines Scandinavia Airbus A320

Photos: Erik Frikke, Björn Larsson, Erik Holm, Torstein, Ole Simon

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